• Everyday and Epic
  • Everyday and Epic
  • Everyday and Epic
  • Everyday and Epic
  • Everyday and Epic
  • Everyday and Epic
  • Everyday and Epic
  • Long Live Lo. Lee. Ta.
  • Long Live Lo. Lee. Ta.
  • Long Live Lo. Lee. Ta.
  • Long Live Lo. Lee. Ta.
  • Long Live Lo. Lee. Ta.

Born in a country where feminism is still a controversial concept, Anna Zandman, a young fashion photographer is striving to rewrite the rules on sexuality, gender, beauty and how one perceives women today. Starting her career at the age of 16, Anna continuously plays with the notion of the female gaze. What it reveals to others around her and what it can shed on contemporary Russia, a country she calls home.

After moving to London and attending London College of Fashion she time and time again repositioned the female figure from the object of desire to an elusive character that strives to expose the dualities in our modern society. Turning to postmodernity to help unravel the stereotypes of feminine beauty Anna worked on making these imperfections of femininity the new beautiful. Selected from thousands of applicants by I-D Magazine, her project ‘Long. Live. Lo. Lee. Ta.’ confronts the viewer with the limitations of age and its perverse implications for beauty. Working with ‘unconventional’ models became key in Anna’s practice, both revealing the tensions of the acceptable and the unacceptable, beauty and ugliness, while shedding the light on the highly selective nature of the fashion industry.

Her work “Everyday and Epic” takes root from the photographer’s Russian background and presents the viewer with a comic cultural commentary on Russian beauty regimes, beliefs and traditions. A Grandmother’s guide to Beauty if you wish; featuring beetroot skincare tips, onion hair products and caviar Botox galore.

In Anna's project 'Beauty Prison', which was exhibited in Paris, Anna strives to deconstruct the implications of how contemporary beauty standards are detrimental to the female identity. Drawing parallels between the physical tortures of "The Iron Maiden" and their embodiment in the psychological tensions that today act as their allegorical imprisonment.