• (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • Material Culture Analysis of a mended silk slip in London College of Fashion Archive.
  • Letter from Burdekin, explaining her reasons for donating the mended items to the archive.
  • Material Culture Analysis of a mended silk stocking in London College of Fashion Archive.
  • Sketches of material culture analysis based on Jules Prown's methodology.
  • Material Culture Analysis of a mended silk slip in London College of Fashion Archive.
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • Material Culture Analysis of a mended silk slip in London College of Fashion Archive.
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • 'Geneology' showing the different possible relationships between objects selected for '(In)Visible Mending' exhibition proposal.
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • (in)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • (in)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • (In)Visible Mending Exhibition Proposal
  • Stories from the Attic Exhibition. Photograph: Aurelia Chiffe
  • Sketches for exhibition "Stories from the Attic"
  • Stories from the Attic Exhibition. Photograph by Aurelia Chiffe
  • Garments that are kept in the archive for safe keeping are often referred to as 'dead'. In this video, the garment comes alive.

Daniela Monasterios Tan is a research based practitioner. Her work is deeply set in an understanding of the materiality of garments, design construction, contextual studies and design history. During her MA, she explored different ways of unlocking narratives from historical and worn garments- challenging the notion that fashion exhibitions can only be of interest if the pristine, the perfect and the elite is displayed.

Daniela undertook first hand research through mending workshops, interviews, archival research, material culture analysis and literature reviews. Her thesis looked at the aesthetics of mending by analysing mended garments in the London College of Fashion Archive and juxtaposing them against avant-garde designs by deconstructive designers like Jun Takahashi and Martin Margiela. By looking at surface theory, she also studied the way denim as a work-wear fabric has been romanticised and appropriated in fashion, culminating in an aesthetically relevant fashion exhibition proposal to today's fashion aesthetics.

Daniela has 9 years of experience working in all aspects of the fashion industry: production, design, management, marketing, styling, communication, trade participation, archival research and development. She founded a fashion label in 2012 (www.mashupcollective.com) which has been sold and exhibited in Singapore, Thailand, Japan and Indonesia. She has collaborated with international brands such as Topshop, Uniqlo and Lomography. Through extensive creative education and experience within art and fashion studios, she has gained a good level of working knowledge related to research and cultural projects.

Daniela is currently based in London. She holds a BA Fashion Design from Lasalle College of the Arts (Singapore) and MA Fashion Curation from London College of Fashion.

www.danielamonasteriostan.com